Category Archives: music

Music tagging — or, voluntary involuntary auditory memories

No, not that kind of music tagging, the kind where you add tags/labels to your mp3 collection. What I want to discuss is a phenomenon that I’ve tried to be conscious about for quite some time: the act of deliberately forming strong associations between certain pieces of music and a particular place. Continue reading Music tagging — or, voluntary involuntary auditory memories

Internet killed the video star

Well, some headlines just lie there dormant, waiting for the right opportunity to become overused. That opportunity is here.

The phenomenon that prompted the headline is called “Take-Away shows” and is being done to perfection at La Blogotheque. The concept is easy; pick up a camera and a cheap microphone, convince a band that this is the new cool, and shoot an improvised, raw, dogma-like music video on the fly. As the web site states, “what makes the beauty of it is all the little incidents, hesitations, and crazy stuff happening unexpectingly”. The results are mixed, as can be expected, but it can be pretty awesome. Continue reading Internet killed the video star

Radiohead makes piracy unethical

I recently wrote about Radiohead’s release of their new album in digital form, downloadable from their Website with a price-tag that you decide yourself — ingenious. One of the interesting consequences of this way of releasing their album is that it make piracy unethical — beyond reasonabe doubt. One of the common arguments pro piracy (or, more politically correct, file sharing) is that sharing an mp3 file is radically different from stealing a album. The latter involves depriving someone (e.g. the record store) of their property, whereas file sharing does not. This argument has some credibility, since the claim is that we cannot simply transfer our moral judgment regarding traditional forms of stealing and apply them straightforwardly to file sharing. Importantly, however, we cannot deduce from this that that piracy is justifiable. This would be, in fact, a logical fallacy of the following form: Continue reading Radiohead makes piracy unethical

Mediadefender and miivii.com — Blatant entrapment

I’m not going to say much about this, since it has already been covered in great detail elsewhere. However, in case you haven’t come across it yet, I’d like to bring to your attention a somewhat shocking insight into the workings of anti-piracy companies. The company in question is Mediadefender, a company which offers services designed to prevent and stop people who engage in alleged copyright infringements. Recently, 700mb of mediadefender’s emails have been retrieved and posted online (see ‘elsewhere’ link above). Among the many disconcerting strategies revealed in the email, the most shocking one is that they launched a Youtube-like Website called mivii.com, which was designed to lure hackers into uploading illegal content and then take action accordingly. One of the most clear-cut examples of entrapment I have ever seen. I am not one who supports large-scale piracy, but the use of entrapment is a serious violation of fundamental rule of law.